Phys.Org: What Men Would Do To Fix The Workplace Equality Gap

By Jill Armstrong

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It is still true that far more men than women have leading roles in manyorganisations. If you ask women to explain this, as many researchers have, they point to workplace culture as a prime culprit.

Many readers will be familiar with the kinds of experiences that frustrate women’s career progress; things like being interrupted or talked over in meetings. But that is old news. Less well known are more subtle trends such as the tendency of men to be promoted on their potential to take on a new role, while women need experience of the role to get the job. This is often called “ability bias” and often happens simply because men’s networks are stronger. Men tend to gravitate to other men in the informal chats that happen in corridors, coffee shops and after five-a-side football games.

These conversations are where connections are made that open the door to opportunities. Men can also kill careers with misplaced “kindness”. In their concern not to upset a woman, men often give less direct and less useful feedback than they do to men. Over time, the consequence of these behaviours for women is that they feel they do not fit in, that they are not being promoted on merit and, as a result, ambition and confidence can melt away.

Men: the missing ingredient

Lack of gender parity is influenced just as much by what men are doing as what women are doing. And yet male voices have been quiet, or not listened to, while initiatives focus on things like mentoring female employees to be more assertive – in effect “fixing the women” to fit in with how things are done.

The better news for women is that many men support gender parity at the top of organisations. The business case is well accepted and, for men in early or mid career in particular, gender parity is a moral issue too. Men tell us that it’s not right that their daughters, female partners and friends should have a different experience of the workplace from the men they work alongside.

So its surprising that very little research has been done to find out what men think of the problems with workplace culture that women report, or to discover what men think can be done about it. This is why Murray Edwards College started the Collaborating with Men research project, working with 40 men in early career, middle management and senior leadership roles in both small businesses and large organisations – and in both the public and private sector.

If individuals are not prepared to change something themselves, then no amount of company policy is going to make a tangible difference. However, given that most men haven’t done much thinking about how their behaviour may negatively affect women’s careers, it follows that it’s not obvious what they can do to help. So the first thing we did was to share a summary of the research from women’s perspective. Many of the participants then discussed this research with their female colleagues. The effect was to make unconscious behaviours visible and to prompt many men to suggest practical changes which could help redress the balance. Let’s pick out some highlights here:

Click here to read more.

 

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